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adore

[uh-dawr, uh-dohr] /əˈdɔr, əˈdoʊr/
verb (used with object), adored, adoring.
1.
to regard with the utmost esteem, love, and respect; honor.
2.
to pay divine honor to; worship:
to adore God.
3.
to like or admire very much:
I simply adore the way your hair is done!
verb (used without object), adored, adoring.
4.
to worship.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; < Latin adōrāre to speak to, pray, worship, equivalent to ad- ad- + ōrāre to speak, beg (see oral); replacing Middle English aour(i)e < Old French aourer < Latin
Related forms
adorer, noun
adoringly, adverb
unadored, adjective
unadoring, adjective
unadoringly, adverb
Synonyms
1. idolize; reverence, revere, venerate.
Antonyms
1. abhor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for adore
  • Performers on stage draw the public in droves to adore them, but the lives of performers offstage draw even larger attention.
  • Every unit has a secondary firing mode that you can toggle, a feature that micromanagement junkies will adore.
  • Everywhere he goes, crowds apparently adore him, keen to forgive his flaws.
  • adore because of its fabulous buttery-rich, ethereal versatility.
  • It should not be to reveal the bad ones and adore the good ones when deciding who teaches our children.
  • People who adore him are people who accept bribes and simple favors in exchange for votes.
  • We'd probably adore a national bon-bon service if bankers would be taxed to pay for it.
  • They adore the portability, the tactile nature of the device, and the overall convenience.
  • His students absolutely adore him and he publishes more than the rest of the dept combined.
  • Models adore it because food prepped on it is slimming and healthful.
British Dictionary definitions for adore

adore

/əˈdɔː/
verb
1.
(transitive) to love intensely or deeply
2.
to worship (a god) with religious rites
3.
(transitive) (informal) to like very much: I adore chocolate
Derived Forms
adorer, noun
adoring, adjective
adoringly, adverb
Word Origin
C15: via French from Latin adōrāre, from ad- to + ōrāre to pray
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for adore
v.

late 14c., aouren, "to worship, pay divine honors to, bow down before," from Old French aorer "to adore, worship, praise" (10c.), from Latin adorare "speak to formally, beseech, ask in prayer," in Late Latin "to worship," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + orare "speak formally, pray" (see orator). Meaning "to honor very highly" is attested from 1590s; weakened sense of "to be very fond of" emerged by 1880s. Related: Adored; adoring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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adore in the Bible

to worship; to express reverence and homage. The forms of adoration among the Jews were putting off the shoes (Ex. 3:5; Josh. 5:15), and prostration (Gen. 17:3; Ps. 95:6; Isa. 44:15, 17, 19; 46:6). To "kiss the Son" in Ps. 2:12 is to adore and worship him. (See Dan. 3:5, 6.) The word itself does not occur in Scripture.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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