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arouse

[uh-rouz] /əˈraʊz/
verb (used with object), aroused, arousing.
1.
to stir to action or strong response; excite:
to arouse a crowd; to arouse suspicion.
2.
to stimulate sexually.
3.
to awaken; wake up:
The footsteps aroused the dog.
verb (used without object), aroused, arousing.
4.
to awake or become aroused:
At dawn the farmers began to arouse.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; a-3 + rouse1, modeled on arise
Related forms
arousability, noun
arousable, adjective
arousal
[uh-rou-zuh l] /əˈraʊ zəl/ (Show IPA),
noun
arouser, noun
nonarousal, noun
overarousal, noun
rearousal, noun
rearouse, verb, rearoused, rearousing.
semiarousal, noun
subarousal, noun
unarousable, adjective
unaroused, adjective
unarousing, adjective
well-aroused, adjective
Can be confused
arose, arouse.
Synonyms
1. animate; inspirit, inspire; incite, provoke, instigate; stimulate, kindle, fire.
Antonyms
1. calm.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the web for aroused
  • Those dreams have been aroused over the past few months.
  • The philanthropy's impending withdrawal has aroused anxiety about what.
  • And for as long as they have had them, these groups have aroused in others a mix of envy and resentment.
  • But among the impoverished peasants in the vicinity, the project has aroused deep misgivings.
  • The rumor emanating from there reflected the instinctive dread aroused by such monstrous innovation.
  • Interestingly, this desire for distinctiveness could be quelled by giving the aroused males a candy bar.
  • The philanthropy's impending withdrawal has aroused.
  • Because of its potential for addictive behavior, casino gambling has aroused the interest of health professionals.
  • And every new medium has aroused fear and even hostility as a result.
  • Its growing economic strength has aroused awe and not a little fear around the globe.
British Dictionary definitions for aroused

arouse

/əˈraʊz/
verb
1.
(transitive) to evoke or elicit (a reaction, emotion, or response); stimulate
2.
to awaken from sleep
Derived Forms
arousal, noun
arouser, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for aroused

arouse

v.

1590s, "awaken" (transitive), from a- (1) "on" + rouse. Related: Aroused; arousing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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8
9
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