catchword

catchword

[kach-wurd]
noun
1.
a memorable or effective word or phrase that is repeated so often that it becomes a slogan, as in a political campaign or in advertising a product.
2.
Also called headword, guide word. a word printed at the top of a page in a dictionary or other reference book to indicate the first or last entry or article on that page. Compare running head.
3.
a device, used especially in old books, to assist the binder in assembling signatures by inserting at the foot of each page the first word of the following page.
4.
keyword ( def 4 ).

Origin:
1720–30; catch + word

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World English Dictionary
catchword (ˈkætʃˌwɜːd)
 
n
1.  a word or phrase made temporarily popular, esp by a political campaign; slogan
2.  a word printed as a running head in a reference book
3.  theatre an actor's cue to speak or enter
4.  the first word of a printed or typewritten page repeated at the bottom of the page preceding

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

catchword
1730, "the first word of the following page inserted at the right-hand lower corner of each page of a book," from catch (v.) + word.; extended to "word caught up and repeated" (especially in the political sense) by 1795.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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