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crouch

[krouch] /kraʊtʃ/
verb (used without object)
1.
to stoop or bend low.
2.
to bend close to the ground, as an animal preparing to spring or shrinking with fear.
3.
to bow or stoop servilely; cringe.
verb (used with object)
4.
to bend low.
noun
5.
the act of crouching.
Origin of crouch
1175-1225
1175-1225; Middle English crouchen, perhaps blend of couchen to lie down (see couch) and croken to crook1
Related forms
croucher, noun
crouchingly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for crouching
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • The big man, who was crouching on the floor playing with the dog, rose hastily.

    The Halo Bettina von Hutten
  • crouching low in the shade of a clump of bushes, Grant stole toward the spot.

    Good Indian B. M. Bower
  • Then, silent and crouching low, the soldiers shoved the brown barrels of their carbines forth again and waited.

  • He had been crouching for a spring at the moment when his master caught him.

    Little Dorrit Charles Dickens
  • They were crouching in one of the gun-pits—a bombardier and three gunners, very cold and very miserable.

    Servants of the Guns Jeffery E. Jeffery
British Dictionary definitions for crouching

crouch

/kraʊtʃ/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to bend low with the limbs pulled up close together, esp (of an animal) in readiness to pounce
2.
(intransitive) to cringe, as in humility or fear
3.
(transitive) to bend (parts of the body), as in humility or fear
noun
4.
the act of stooping or bending
Word Origin
C14: perhaps from Old French crochir to become bent like a hook, from croche hook
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for crouching

crouch

v.

late 14c., probably from Old French crochir "become bent, crooked," from croche "hook" (see crochet). Related: Crouched; crouching. As a noun, from 1590s.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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17
21
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