delude

[dih-lood]
verb (used with object), deluded, deluding.
1.
to mislead the mind or judgment of; deceive: His conceit deluded him into believing he was important.
2.
Obsolete. to mock or frustrate the hopes or aims of.
3.
Obsolete. to elude; evade.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English deluden < Latin dēlūdere to play false, equivalent to dē- de- + lūdere to play

deluder, noun
deludingly, adverb
nondeluded, adjective
nondeluding, adjective
undeluded, adjective
undeludedly, adverb
undeluding, adjective


1. beguile, cozen, dupe, cheat, defraud, gull.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
delude (dɪˈluːd)
 
vb
1.  to deceive the mind or judgment of; mislead; beguile
2.  rare to frustrate (hopes, expectations, etc)
 
[C15: from Latin dēlūdere to mock, play false, from de- + lūdere to play]
 
de'ludable
 
adj
 
de'luder
 
n
 
de'ludingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

delude
c.1400, from L. deludere "to mock, deceive," from de- "down, to one's detriment" + ludere "to play" (see ludicrous).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Capable of deluding populations with polar opposite predictions within the same direction.
My counter argument is that you are only deluding yourself if you believe that you are truly educating anybody any other way.
Those who believe government can be divorced from politics are either deluding themselves or trying to delude others.
It is to be hoped they have, and that they are not deluding us with an expectation joyous but deceptive.
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