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derange

[dih-reynj]
verb (used with object), deranged, deranging.
1.
to throw into disorder; disarrange.
2.
to disturb the condition, action, or function of.
3.
to make insane.

Origin:
1770–80; < French déranger, Old French desrengier, equivalent to des- dis-1 + rengier; see range

derangeable, adjective
deranger, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
derange (dɪˈreɪndʒ)
 
vb
1.  to disturb the order or arrangement of; throw into disorder; disarrange
2.  to disturb the action or operation of
3.  to make insane; drive mad
 
[C18: from Old French desrengier, from des-dis-1 + reng row, order]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

derange
1776, from Fr. déranger, from O.Fr. desrengier "disarrange," from des- "do the opposite of" + reng "line, row" (see rank). Mental sense first recorded c.1790.

deranged
c.1790, "insane;" of other things, "out of order," from 1796; pp. adj. from derange.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It starts more or less normally, but grows increasingly deranged as it proceeds.
It is a completely deranged system and it relies on permanent hysteria and coercion.
She dreamed of deranged babysitters and oozing aliens.
Not to say that one must be deranged by constant outrage over the world's injustices and their causes.
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