disoriented

[dis-awr-ee-en-tid, -ohr-]
adjective
confused as to time or place; out of touch: therapy for disoriented patients.

Origin:
disorient + -ed2


distracted, mixed up, unstable, unhinged.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

disorient

[dis-awr-ee-ent, -ohr-]
verb (used with object)
1.
to cause to lose one's way: The strange streets disoriented him.
2.
to confuse by removing or obscuring something that has guided a person, group, or culture, as customs, moral standards, etc.: Society has been disoriented by changing values.
3.
Psychiatry. to cause to lose perception of time, place, or one's personal identity.

Origin:
1645–55; < French désorienter, equivalent to dés- dis-1 + orienter to orient

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disorient
1650s, from Fr. désorienter, from dés- "dis-" (see dis-) + orienter (see orient (v.)). Related: Disoriented; disorienting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Virtually anything that caused stress disoriented them, and they quickly
  descended into pre-meltdown conditions.
Unfortunately, governments seem to be almost as disoriented as everyone else at
  the moment.
If one bull gets separated, injuries usually occur as it becomes disoriented
  and charges.
The airplane went up at night and the aircrew quickly became completely
  disoriented.
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