disturbed

[dih-sturbd]
adjective
1.
marked by symptoms of mental illness: a disturbed personality.
2.
agitated or distressed; disrupted: disturbed seas; a disturbed situation.
noun
3.
(used with a plural verb) persons who exhibit symptoms of neurosis or psychosis (usually preceded by the ).

Origin:
1585–95; disturb + -ed2

undisturbed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

disturb

[dih-sturb]
verb (used with object)
1.
to interrupt the quiet, rest, peace, or order of; unsettle.
2.
to interfere with; interrupt; hinder: Please do not disturb me when I'm working.
3.
to interfere with the arrangement, order, or harmony of; disarrange: to disturb the papers on her desk.
4.
to perplex; trouble: to be disturbed by strange behavior.
verb (used without object)
5.
to cause disturbance to someone's sleep, rest, etc.: Do not disturb.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English disto(u)rben, disturben < Anglo-French disto(u)rber, desturber < Latin disturbāre to demolish, upset, equivalent to dis- dis-1 + turbāre to confuse

disturber, noun
predisturb, verb (used with object)


1. bother, annoy, trouble, pester.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
disturb (dɪˈstɜːb)
 
vb
1.  to intrude on; interrupt
2.  to destroy or interrupt the quietness or peace of
3.  to disarrange; muddle
4.  (often passive) to upset or agitate; trouble: I am disturbed at your bad news
5.  to inconvenience; put out: don't disturb yourself on my account
 
[C13: from Latin disturbāre, from dis-1 + turbāre to confuse]
 
dis'turber
 
n

disturbed (dɪˈstɜːbd)
 
adj
psychiatry emotionally upset, troubled, or maladjusted

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

disturb
early 13c., from L. disturbare "throw into disorder," from dis- "completely" + turbare "to disorder, disturb," from turba "turmoil." Disturbed "emotionally or mentally unstable" is from 1904. Related: Disturbing.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Scientists, not surprisingly, are disturbed by these developments.
No doubt you now understand why these linguistic mysteries have disturbed my
  sleep for the past couple of years.
Their forest habitat is being disturbed and destroyed in many places.
Long-lived but initially slow to grow, peonies sulk if disturbed.
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