follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

entice

[en-tahys] /ɛnˈtaɪs/
verb (used with object), enticed, enticing.
1.
to lead on by exciting hope or desire; allure; inveigle:
They were enticed westward by dreams of gold.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; Middle English enticen < Old French enticier to incite < Vulgar Latin *intitiāre, equivalent to Latin in- in-2 + -titiāre, verbal derivative of *titius, for titiō piece of burning wood
Related forms
enticingly, adverb
enticingness, noun
nonenticing, adjective
nonenticingly, adverb
unenticed, adjective
unenticing, adjective
Synonyms
lure, attract, decoy, tempt.
Antonyms
repel.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for entice
  • Retailers will feel the usual seasonal pinch, and will have to labor harder to entice cash from the customers.
  • Travel providers are reacting with sales meant to entice wary travelers into a Vegas vacation.
  • One of the most ostentatiously adorned creatures on Earth, the peacock uses its brilliant plumage to entice females.
  • Caribbean islands, of course, promote their best features to entice travelers.
  • Anyone who's walked into a mall has been enticed by the smell of cinnamon buns or chocolate chip cookies.
  • Retailers often use mail-in rebates to entice shoppers.
  • In order to entice people to travel to Hawaii, hotels have lowered room rates and are offering free nights.
  • This year, many airlines are offering great deals to entice Americans to cross the big pond.
  • The theater district is lined with finds guaranteed to entice last-minute shoppers.
  • The extraordinary attention may entice visitors into making my mistake.
British Dictionary definitions for entice

entice

/ɪnˈtaɪs/
verb
1.
(transitive) to attract or draw towards oneself by exciting hope or desire; tempt; allure
Derived Forms
enticement, noun
enticer, noun
enticing, adjective
enticingly, adverb
enticingness, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Old French enticier, from Vulgar Latin intitiāre (unattested) to incite, from Latin titiō firebrand
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for entice
v.

late 13c., intice, from Old French enticier "to stir up (fire), to excite, incite," perhaps from Vulgar Latin *intitiare "set on fire," from Latin in- "in" (see in- (2)) + titio (genitive titionis) "firebrand," of uncertain origin. Meaning "to allure, attract" is from c.1300. Related: Enticed; enticing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for entice

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for entice

8
10
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with entice

Nearby words for entice