epistrophe

epistrophe

[ih-pis-truh-fee]
noun
1.
Also called epiphora. Rhetoric. the repetition of a word or words at the end of two or more successive verses, clauses, or sentences, as in “I should do Brutus wrong, and Cassius wrong. …” Compare anaphora ( def 1 ).
2.
Neoplatonism. the realization by an intellect of its remoteness from the One.

Origin:
1640–50; < Neo-Latin < Greek epistrophḗ; see epi-, strophe

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World English Dictionary
epistrophe (ɪˈpɪstrəfɪ)
 
n
rhetoric repetition of a word at the end of successive clauses or sentences
 
[C17: New Latin, from Greek, from epi- + strophē a turning]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

epistrophe
from Gk. epistrophe, from epi upon + strophe a turning (see strophe).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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