in-sipidity

insipid

[in-sip-id]
adjective
1.
without distinctive, interesting, or stimulating qualities; vapid: an insipid personality.
2.
without sufficient taste to be pleasing, as food or drink; bland: a rather insipid soup.

Origin:
1610–20; < Latin insipidus, equivalent to in- in-3 + -sipidus, combining form of sapidus sapid

insipidity, insipidness, noun
insipidly, adverb

incipient, insipid, insipient.


1, 2. flat, dull, uninteresting. 2. tasteless, bland.
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World English Dictionary
insipid (ɪnˈsɪpɪd)
 
adj
1.  lacking spirit; boring
2.  lacking taste; unpalatable
 
[C17: from Latin insipidus, from in-1 + sapidus full of flavour, sapid]
 
insi'pidity
 
n
 
in'sipidness
 
n
 
in'sipidly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

insipid
1610s, "without taste or perceptible flavor," from Fr. insipide, from L.L. inspidus "tasteless," from L. in- "not" + sapidus "tasty," from sapere "have a taste" (also "be wise"). Fig. meaning "uninteresting, dull" first recorded 1640s, but it was also a secondary sense in M.L.
"In ye coach ... went Mrs. Barlow, the King's mistress and mother to ye Duke of Monmouth, a browne, beautifull, bold, but insipid creature." [John Evelyn, diary, Aug. 18, 1649]
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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