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inclined

[in-klahynd] /ɪnˈklaɪnd/
adjective
1.
deviating in direction from the horizontal or vertical; sloping.
2.
disposed; of a mind (usually followed by to):
He was inclined to stay.
3.
having a physical tendency; leaning.
4.
tending in a direction that makes an angle with anything else.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English enclyned. See incline, -ed2
Related forms
half-inclined, adjective
quasi-inclined, adjective
uninclined, adjective
well-inclined, adjective

incline

[v. in-klahyn; n. in-klahyn, in-klahyn] /v. ɪnˈklaɪn; n. ˈɪn klaɪn, ɪnˈklaɪn/
verb (used with object), inclined, inclining.
1.
to deviate from the vertical or horizontal; slant.
2.
to have a mental tendency, preference, etc.; be disposed:
We incline to rest and relaxation these days.
3.
to tend, in a physical sense; approximate:
The flowers incline toward blue.
4.
to tend in character or in course of action:
a political philosophy that inclines toward the conservative.
5.
to lean; bend.
6.
to dispose (a person) in mind, habit, etc. (usually followed by to):
His attitude did not incline me to help him.
7.
to bow, nod, or bend (the head, body, etc.):
He inclined his head in greeting.
8.
to cause to lean or bend in a particular direction.
noun
9.
an inclined surface; slope; slant.
10.
Railroads.
  1. Also called inclined plane, incline plane. a cable railroad, the gradient of which is approximately 45°.
  2. any railroad or portion of a railroad, the gradient of which is too steep for ordinary locomotive adhesion alone to be effective.
11.
Mining.
  1. an angled shaft following a dipping vein.
  2. an inclined haulageway.
Idioms
12.
incline one's ear, to listen, especially willingly or favorably:
to incline one's ear to another's plea.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English inclinen < Latin inclīnāre, equivalent to in- in-2 + -clīnāre to bend (see lean1); replacing Middle English enclinen < Middle French < Latin, as above
Related forms
incliner, noun
overincline, verb, overinclined, overinclining.
reincline, verb, reinclined, reinclining.
Synonyms
1. lean, slope, rise, fall, pitch. 2. tend, lean. 3, 4. verge, veer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for inclined
  • The plank would be inclined to split or warp if not reinforced by long metal screws that can be tightened as needed.
  • And when the pie is cut, the meringue is inclined to slip off the wedges.
  • They were inclined to abandon the entire effort and start again from scratch.
  • His genius was inclined to the pathetic, and none could touch with truer effect the chords of human sympathy.
  • From that point, the government followed its natural tendency, and inclined strongly to aristocracy.
  • We are probably far too much inclined to over-estimate the conscious character even of intellectual and artistic productions.
  • He was by nature inclined to accept the established order and make the best of it.
  • His great zeal inclined him to go and preach the faith to these northern nations, but the king would not allow of it.
  • He who has it in his power to commit sin, is less inclined to do so.
  • Knowing him inclined to favour the orthodox, he exacted from him an oath, that he would never restore their profession.
British Dictionary definitions for inclined

inclined

/ɪnˈklaɪnd/
adjective
1.
(postpositive) often foll by to. having a disposition; tending
2.
sloping or slanting

incline

verb (ɪnˈklaɪn)
1.
to deviate or cause to deviate from a particular plane, esp a vertical or horizontal plane; slope or slant
2.
when tr, may take an infinitive. to be disposed or cause to be disposed (towards some attitude or to do something) he inclines towards levity, that does not incline me to think that you are right
3.
to bend or lower (part of the body, esp the head), as in a bow or in order to listen
4.
incline one's ear, to listen favourably (to)
noun (ˈɪnklaɪn; ɪnˈklaɪn)
5.
an inclined surface or slope; gradient
6.
short for inclined railway
Derived Forms
incliner, noun
Word Origin
C13: from Latin inclīnāre to cause to lean, from clīnāre to bend; see lean1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inclined

incline

v.

c.1300, "to bend or bow toward," from Old French encliner, from Latin inclinare "to cause to lean; bend, incline, turn, divert," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + clinare "to bend," from PIE *klei-n-, suffixed form of *klei- "to lean" (see lean (v.)). Metaphoric sense of "have a mental disposition toward" is early 15c. in English (but existed in classical Latin). Related: Inclined; inclining.

n.

c.1600, "mental tendency," from incline (v.). The literal meaning "slant, slope" is attested from 1846.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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