intolerable

[in-tol-er-uh-buhl]
adjective
1.
not tolerable; unendurable; insufferable: intolerable pain.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin intolerābilis. See in-3, tolerable

intolerability, intolerableness, noun
intolerably, adverb
quasi-intolerable, adjective
quasi-intolerably, adverb
superintolerable, adjective
superintolerableness, noun
superintolerably, adverb

intolerable, intolerant.


1. unbearable, insupportable.


1. endurable.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
intolerable (ɪnˈtɒlərəbəl)
 
adj
1.  more than can be tolerated or endured; insufferable
2.  informal extremely irritating or annoying
 
intolera'bility
 
n
 
in'tolerableness
 
n
 
in'tolerably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

intolerable
1435, from L. intolerabilis "that cannot bear, that cannot be borne," from in- "not" + tolerabilis "that may be endured," from tolerare "to tolerate" (see toleration). Intolerance "unwillingness to endure a differing opinion" first attested 1765.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Action to correct that intolerable situation need not await the additional
  inquiries.
In fact, it renders that condition fearsome, its prospect intolerable.
Despite exporters' complaints, the devaluations elsewhere are not putting them
  under intolerable pain.
Oblivion to the effects of one's words or movement is intolerable.
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