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lamented

[luh-men-tid] /ləˈmɛn tɪd/
adjective
1.
mourned for, as a person who is dead:
Our late lamented friend.
Origin
1605-1615
1605-15; lament + -ed2
Related forms
lamentedly, adverb
quasi-lamented, adjective
unlamented, adjective

lament

[luh-ment] /ləˈmɛnt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to feel or express sorrow or regret for:
to lament his absence.
2.
to mourn for or over.
verb (used without object)
3.
to feel, show, or express grief, sorrow, or regret.
4.
to mourn deeply.
noun
5.
an expression of grief or sorrow.
6.
a formal expression of sorrow or mourning, especially in verse or song; an elegy or dirge.
Origin
1520-30; (noun) < Latin lāmentum plaint; (v.) < Latin lāmentārī, derivative of lāmentum
Related forms
lamenter, noun
lamentingly, adverb
Synonyms
1, 2. bewail, bemoan, deplore. 3, 4. grieve, weep. 5. lamentation, moan. 6. monody, threnody.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for lamented
  • Over the last five years the vast majority of articles on bilingual education have lamented its failure.
  • One president lamented to me recently about the amenities and services demanded by students and parents.
  • He also lamented the growing influence of public sector unions, as well as overregulation of private business.
  • The book lamented this fundamental loss-and its social, psychological and even political implications.
  • For more than two millennia, people had lamented that deforestation had resulted in rising temperatures.
  • He lamented decisions by lawmakers that he said do not favor seniors.
  • Commentators have lamented the dwindling number of students majoring in the humanities, but the picture may not be that bleak.
  • Some educators have lamented that teenagers are fretting about college at increasingly younger ages.
  • He made a habit of correcting students who used the word, and lamented the linguistic sloppiness in hallway conversations.
  • Others lamented that she was shocked, depressed, bewildered.
British Dictionary definitions for lamented

lamented

/ləˈmɛntɪd/
adjective
1.
grieved for or regretted (often in the phrase late lamented): our late lamented employer
Derived Forms
lamentedly, adverb

lament

/ləˈmɛnt/
verb
1.
to feel or express sorrow, remorse, or regret (for or over)
noun
2.
an expression of sorrow
3.
a poem or song in which a death is lamented
Derived Forms
lamenter, noun
lamentingly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin lāmentum
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lamented
adj.

"mourned for," 1610, from past participle of lament (v.).

lament

v.

mid-15c., back-formation from lamentation or else from Middle French lamenter "to moan, bewail" (14c.) and directly from Latin lamentari, from lamentum (see lamentation). Related: Lamented; lamenting.

n.

1590s, from Middle French lament and directly from Latin lamentum (see lamentation).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Encyclopedia Article for lamented

lament

a nonnarrative poem expressing deep grief or sorrow over a personal loss. The form developed as part of the oral tradition along with heroic poetry and exists in most languages. Examples include Deor's Lament, an early Anglo-Saxon poem, in which a minstrel regrets his change of status in relation to his patron, and the ancient Sumerian "Lament for the Destruction of Ur." Compare complaint; elegy.

Learn more about lament with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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