lament

[luh-ment]
verb (used with object)
1.
to feel or express sorrow or regret for: to lament his absence.
2.
to mourn for or over.
verb (used without object)
3.
to feel, show, or express grief, sorrow, or regret.
4.
to mourn deeply.
noun
5.
an expression of grief or sorrow.
6.
a formal expression of sorrow or mourning, especially in verse or song; an elegy or dirge.

Origin:
1520–30; (noun) < Latin lāmentum plaint; (v.) < Latin lāmentārī, derivative of lāmentum

lamenter, noun
lamentingly, adverb


1, 2. bewail, bemoan, deplore. 3, 4. grieve, weep. 5. lamentation, moan. 6. monody, threnody.
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World English Dictionary
lament (ləˈmɛnt)
 
vb
1.  to feel or express sorrow, remorse, or regret (for or over)
 
n
2.  an expression of sorrow
3.  a poem or song in which a death is lamented
 
[C16: from Latin lāmentum]
 
la'menter
 
n
 
la'mentingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lament
1530s, back-formation from lamentation. The noun is recorded from 1590s. Related: Lamented; lamenting.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
And dozens of reports arrived lamenting the state of affairs and outlining the
  path forward.
Instead of lamenting that kids prefer these foods, come up with healthy foods
  that taste better.
Well, after lamenting the slow volcano news, things are beginning to pick up
  again.
Far from lamenting last week's highly publicized test failure, advocates of a
  defense against ballistic missiles should rejoice.
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