luxury

[luhk-shuh-ree, luhg-zhuh-]
noun, plural luxuries.
1.
a material object, service, etc., conducive to sumptuous living, usually a delicacy, elegance, or refinement of living rather than a necessity: Gold cufflinks were a luxury not allowed for in his budget.
2.
free or habitual indulgence in or enjoyment of comforts and pleasures in addition to those necessary for a reasonable standard of well-being: a life of luxury on the French Riviera.
3.
a means of ministering to such indulgence or enjoyment: This travel plan gives you the luxury of choosing which countries you can visit.
4.
a pleasure out of the ordinary allowed to oneself: the luxury of an extra piece of the cake.
5.
a foolish or worthless form of self-indulgence: the luxury of self-pity.
6.
Archaic. lust; lasciviousness; lechery.
adjective
7.
of, pertaining to, or affording luxury: a luxury hotel.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English luxurie < Latin luxuria rankness, luxuriance, equivalent to luxur- (combining form of luxus extravagance) + -ia -y3

semiluxury, noun, plural semiluxuries.
superluxury, noun, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
luxury (ˈlʌkʃərɪ)
 
n , pl -ries
1.  indulgence in and enjoyment of rich, comfortable, and sumptuous living
2.  (sometimes plural) something that is considered an indulgence rather than a necessity
3.  something pleasant and satisfying: the luxury of independence
4.  (modifier) relating to, indicating, or supplying luxury: a luxury liner
 
[C14 (in the sense: lechery): via Old French from Latin luxuria excess, from luxus extravagance]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

luxury
mid-14c., "lasciviousness, sinful self-indulgence," from O.Fr. luxurie, from L. luxuria "excess, luxury," from luxus "excess, extravagance, magnificence," probably a fig. use of luxus (adj.) "dislocated," which is related to luctari "wrestle, strain." Lost its pejorative taint 17c. Meaning "habit of
indulgence in what is choice or costly" is from 1630s; that of "sumptuous surroundings" is from 1704; that of "something enjoyable or comfortable beyond life's necessities" is from 1780. First used as an adjective 1930.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Idioms & Phrases

luxury

see lap of luxury.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer.
Copyright © 1997. Published by Houghton Mifflin.
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Example sentences
These unique abodes are less tent and more reminiscent of a room at a luxury
  resort.
For tomato lovers and avid gardeners, too many tomatoes isn't a complaint, it's
  a luxury.
The luxury industry pulled a rather amazing feat in the last few years.
But less opulent examples of luxury cars going electric were also in evidence.
Idioms & Phrases
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