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pique1

[peek] /pik/
verb (used with object), piqued, piquing.
1.
to affect with sharp irritation and resentment, especially by some wound to pride:
She was greatly piqued when they refused her invitation.
2.
to wound (the pride, vanity, etc.).
3.
to excite (interest, curiosity, etc.):
Her curiosity was piqued by the gossip.
4.
to arouse an emotion or provoke to action:
to pique someone to answer a challenge.
5.
Archaic. to pride (oneself) (usually followed by on or upon).
verb (used without object), piqued, piquing.
6.
to arouse pique in someone:
an action that piqued when it was meant to soothe.
noun
7.
a feeling of irritation or resentment, as from a wound to pride or self-esteem:
to be in a pique.
8.
Obsolete. a state of irritated feeling between persons.
Origin
1525-1535
1525-35; < Middle French pique (noun), piquer (v.) < Vulgar Latin *piccare to pick1; see pickax, pike2, piqué
Related forms
unpiqued, adjective
Synonyms
1. offend, sting, nettle, vex, irritate, chafe. 2. affront. 3. stimulate, stir, prick, incite, goad.
Antonyms
1. please. 2. compliment.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for piqued
  • Globalisation made economic realities more apparent and piqued people's curiosity.
  • That island—and those spires—piqued my interest.
  • But the concept piqued the interest of some media buyers.
  • At best, the reader's interest is piqued but not satisfied.
  • Miller is one of several thousand piano teachers who have turned to computer technology to keep their students' interest piqued.
  • He became aware that he had not an ounce of real affection for Isabelle, but her coldness piqued him.
  • Still, the new venture piqued old nerves.
  • The price drop has piqued my interest but I can't buy it right away.
  • He said his interest was piqued by firsthand evidence that a healthy lifestyle does not guarantee long life.
  • We have way too much in common for my interest not to be piqued.
British Dictionary definitions for piqued

pique1

/piːk/
noun
1.
a feeling of resentment or irritation, as from having one's pride wounded
verb (transitive) piques, piquing, piqued
2.
to cause to feel resentment or irritation
3.
to excite or arouse
4.
foll by on or upon. to pride or congratulate (oneself)
Word Origin
C16: from French, from piquer to prick, sting; see pick1

pique2

/piːk/
noun
1.
a score of 30 points made by a player from a combination of cards held before play begins and from play while his opponent's score is nil
verb
2.
to score a pique (against)
Word Origin
C17: from French pic, of uncertain origin

piqué

/ˈpiːkeɪ/
noun
1.
a close-textured fabric of cotton, silk, or spun rayon woven with lengthwise ribs
Word Origin
C19: from French piqué pricked, from piquer to prick
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for piqued

pique

n.

1530s, "fit of ill feeling," from Middle French pique "a prick, sting, irritation," noun of action from piquer (see pike (n.2)).

v.

"to excite to anger," 1670s, from French piquer "to prick, sting" (see pike (n.2)). Softened meaning "to stimulate, excite" is from 1690s. Related: Piqued; piquing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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