predestination

[pri-des-tuh-ney-shuhn, pree-des-]
noun
1.
an act of predestinating or predestining.
2.
the state of being predestinated or predestined.
3.
fate; destiny.
4.
Theology.
a.
the action of God in foreordaining from eternity whatever comes to pass.
b.
the decree of God by which certain souls are foreordained to salvation. Compare election ( def 4 ), double predestination.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English predestinacioun < Late Latin praedestinātiōn- (stem of praedestinātiō). See predestinate, -ion

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
predestination (priːˌdɛstɪˈneɪʃən)
 
n
1.  theol
 a.  the act of God foreordaining every event from eternity
 b.  the doctrine or belief, esp associated with Calvin, that the final salvation of some of mankind is foreordained from eternity by God
2.  the act of predestining or the state of being predestined

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

predestination
mid-14c., "the action of God in foreordaining certain of mankind through grace to salvation or eternal life," from L.L. prædestinationem (nom. prædestinatio) "a determining beforehand," from prædestinatus, pp. of prædestinare "appoint or determine beforehand," from L. præ-
"before" + destinare "appoint, determine" (see destiny). First used in theological sense by Augustine, popularized by Calvin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

predestination definition


In theology, the doctrine that all events have been willed by God. John Calvin interpreted predestination to mean that God willed eternal damnation for some people and salvation for others.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Predestination definition


This word is properly used only with reference to God's plan or purpose of salvation. The Greek word rendered "predestinate" is found only in these six passages, Acts 4:28; Rom. 8:29, 30; 1 Cor. 2:7; Eph. 1:5, 11; and in all of them it has the same meaning. They teach that the eternal, sovereign, immutable, and unconditional decree or "determinate purpose" of God governs all events. This doctrine of predestination or election is beset with many difficulties. It belongs to the "secret things" of God. But if we take the revealed word of God as our guide, we must accept this doctrine with all its mysteriousness, and settle all our questionings in the humble, devout acknowledgment, "Even so, Father: for so it seemed good in thy sight." For the teaching of Scripture on this subject let the following passages be examined in addition to those referred to above; Gen. 21:12; Ex. 9:16; 33:19; Deut. 10:15; 32:8; Josh. 11:20; 1 Sam. 12:22; 2 Chr. 6:6; Ps. 33:12; 65:4; 78:68; 135:4; Isa. 41:1-10; Jer. 1:5; Mark 13:20; Luke 22:22; John 6:37; 15:16; 17:2, 6, 9; Acts 2:28; 3:18; 4:28; 13:48; 17:26; Rom. 9:11, 18, 21; 11:5; Eph. 3:11; 1 Thess. 1:4; 2 Thess. 2:13; 2 Tim. 1:9; Titus 1:2; 1 Pet. 1:2. (See DECREES OF GOD ØT0001002; ELECTION.) Hodge has well remarked that, "rightly understood, this doctrine (1) exalts the majesty and absolute sovereignty of God, while it illustrates the riches of his free grace and his just displeasure with sin. (2.) It enforces upon us the essential truth that salvation is entirely of grace. That no one can either complain if passed over, or boast himself if saved. (3.) It brings the inquirer to absolute self-despair and the cordial embrace of the free offer of Christ. (4.) In the case of the believer who has the witness in himself, this doctrine at once deepens his humility and elevates his confidence to the full assurance of hope" (Outlines).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
In bridge terms, free will appears to prevail over predestination all the time.
It's the weirdest form of predestination you're likely to run into during a
  video game this year.
The mood of predestination and yearning continues when they come together in a
  duet.
Predestination only works for those who never make mistakes.
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