proffer

[prof-er]
verb (used with object)
1.
to put before a person for acceptance; offer.
noun
2.
the act of proffering.
3.
an offer or proposal.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English profren < Anglo-French profrer, variant of Old French poroffrir, equivalent to por- pro-1 + offrir to offer

profferer, noun
unproffered, adjective


1. volunteer, propose, suggest. See offer.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
proffer (ˈprɒfə)
 
vb
1.  (tr) to offer for acceptance; tender
 
n
2.  the act of proffering
 
[C13: from Old French proffrir, from pro-1 + offrir to offer]
 
'profferer
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

proffer
late 13c., from Anglo-Fr. profrier (mid-13c.), O.Fr. poroffrir (c.1080), from por- "forth" (from L. pro-) + offrir "to offer," from L. offerre (see offer).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The officers hurried for such restoratives as the bar supplied, and two
  physicians who were near by proffered their services.
All these proffered reasons for fatal coal mining accidents miss the mark by a
  mile.
The other option required two business days of bartering among sites to see
  which one proffered the lowest price.
If the user rejects the proffered representation, the software displays its
  less-favored guesses.
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