propinquity

[proh-ping-kwi-tee]
noun
1.
nearness in place; proximity.
2.
nearness of relation; kinship.
3.
affinity of nature; similarity.
4.
nearness in time.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English propinquite < Latin propinquitās nearness, equivalent to propinqu(us) near (prop(e) near (see pro-1) + -inquus adj. suffix) + -itās -ity

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To propinquity
Collins
World English Dictionary
propinquity (prəˈpɪŋkwɪtɪ)
 
n
1.  nearness in place or time
2.  nearness in relationship
 
[C14: from Latin propinquitās closeness, from propinquus near, from prope near by]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

propinquity
late 14c., from O.Fr. propinquite (c.1240), from L. propinquitatem (nom. propinquitas) "nearness, vicinity," from propinquus "near, neighboring," from prope "near" (enlarged from PIE base *pro- "before") + suffix -inquus.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Residents tolerate--even welcome--human propinquity.
We have no idea what makes them friends other than their social propinquity.
Their propinquity is a corroborating point, as is the quotation from the trial transcript.
Telecommunications and computers have reduced the importance of geographic propinquity for people.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;