purported

[per-pawr-tid, -pohr-]
adjective
reputed or claimed; alleged: We saw no evidence of his purported wealth.

Origin:
1890–95; purport + -ed2

purportedly, adverb
unpurported, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

purport

[v. per-pawrt, -pohrt, pur-pawrt, -pohrt; n. pur-pawrt, -pohrt]
verb (used with object)
1.
to present, especially deliberately, the appearance of being; profess or claim, often falsely: a document purporting to be official.
2.
to convey to the mind as the meaning or thing intended; express or imply.
noun
3.
the meaning, import, or sense: the main purport of your letter.
4.
purpose; intention; object: the main purport of their visit to France.

Origin:
1375–1425; (v.) late Middle English purporten < Anglo-French purporter to convey, equivalent to pur- pro-1 + porter to carry (< Latin portāre); (noun) late Middle English < Anglo-French, derivative of the v.

purportless, adjective


2. mean, intend, signify. 3. implication, drift, trend, gist. See meaning.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To purported
Collins
World English Dictionary
purport
 
vb
1.  to claim (to be a certain thing, etc) by manner or appearance, esp falsely
2.  (esp of speech or writing) to signify or imply
 
n
3.  meaning; significance
4.  purpose; object; intention
 
[C15: from Anglo-French: contents, from Old French porporter to convey, from por- forth + porter to carry, from Latin portāre]

purported (pɜːˈpɔːtɪd)
 
adj
alleged; supposed; rumoured: a purported two million dollar deal
 
pur'portedly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

purport
1422, from Anglo-Fr. purport (1278), from purporter "to contain," from pur- (from L. pro- "forth") + O.Fr. porter "to carry," from L. portare "to carry" (see port (1)). The verb is attested from 1528. Purportedly "allegedly" first recorded 1949.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
And the speed of their purported ascent, through a week of consistently bad
  weather, seemed equally improbable.
While they are two totally different drinks, both are purported to wake the
  corpse.
The purported benefits: fewer hospital visits, better care, and much lower
  costs.
Scores of popular books have seized on this purported dichotomy.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature