rafter

1 [raf-ter, rahf-]
noun
1.
any of a series of timbers or the like, usually having a pronounced slope, for supporting the sheathing and covering of a roof.
verb (used with object)
2.
British Dialect. to plow (a field) so that the soil of a furrow is pushed over onto an unplowed adjacent strip.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English rǣfter; cognate with Middle Low German rafter, Old Norse raptr. See raft1

unraftered, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

rafter

2 [raf-ter, rahf-]
noun
1.
a person who engages in the sport or pastime of rafting.
2.
a person who travels on a raft, especially to flee a country.

rafter

3 [raf-ter, rahf-]
noun
a flock, especially of turkeys.

Origin:
raft2 + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
rafter (ˈrɑːftə)
 
n
any one of a set of sloping beams that form the framework of a roof
 
[Old English ræfter; related to Old Saxon rehter, Old Norse raptr, Old High German rāvo; see raft1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rafter
"sloping timber of a roof," O.E. ræftras (W.Saxon), reftras (Mercian), both plural, related to O.N. raptr (see raft (1)), from P.Gmc. *raf-.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
All one needed to set up a strappado was a sturdy rafter and a rope.
She relaxed and stretched in a yawn, hitting a rafter of cork.
Rafter ties certainly are not mandatory, and many roofs do not have them.
The rafter on the pressure side of the roof does not help hold down the rafter
  on the uplift side of the roof.
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