rafting

[raf-ting, rahf-]

Origin:
1690–1700; raft1 + -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

raft

1 [raft, rahft]
noun
1.
a more or less rigid floating platform made of buoyant material or materials: an inflatable rubber raft.
2.
a collection of logs, planks, casks, etc., fastened together for floating on water.
4.
a slab of reinforced concrete providing a footing on yielding soil, usually for a whole building, so that the weight of the soil that would be displaced by the settlement of the building exceeds the weight of the building itself; mat.
verb (used with object)
5.
to transport on a raft.
6.
to form (logs or the like) into a raft.
7.
to travel or cross by raft.
8.
(of an ice floe) to transport (embedded organic or rock debris) from the shore out to sea.
verb (used without object)
9.
to use a raft; go or travel on a raft.
10.
(of an ice floe) to overlap another ice floe.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English rafte, perhaps < Old Norse raptr rafter1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
raft1 (rɑːft)
 
n
1.  a buoyant platform of logs, planks, etc, used as a vessel or moored platform
2.  a thick slab of reinforced concrete laid over soft ground to provide a foundation for a building
 
vb
3.  to convey on or travel by raft, or make a raft from
 
[C15: from Old Norse raptrrafter]
 
'rafting1
 
n

raft2 (rɑːft)
 
n
informal a large collection or amount: a raft of old notebooks discovered in a cupboard
 
[C19: from raff]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

raft
"floating platform," 1497, originally "rafter" (c.1420), from O.N. raptr "log" (O.N. -pt- pronounced as -ft-), related to M.L.G. rafter, rachter "rafter."

raft
"large collection," 1830, variant of raff "heap, large amount," from M.E. raf (see raffish, riffraff); form and sense associated with raft (1).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
To relax, he plays racquetball three times a week and goes whitewater rafting
  every summer.
From skiing to rafting to cycling, recreation opportunities are minutes away.
For a combination rafting and hiking shoe, it was aces.
If you're planning a visit in summer, lazily catch the views from a rafting
  trip.
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