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roam

[rohm] /roʊm/
verb (used without object)
1.
to walk, go, or travel without a fixed purpose or direction; ramble; wander; rove:
to roam about the world.
verb (used with object)
2.
to wander over or through:
to roam the countryside.
noun
3.
an act or instance of roaming; a ramble.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English romen < ?
Related forms
roamer, noun
unroaming, adjective
Synonyms
1. stray, stroll, prowl. Roam, ramble, range, rove imply wandering about over (usually) a considerable amount of territory. Roam implies a wandering or traveling over a large area, especially as prompted by restlessness or curiosity: to roam through a forest. Ramble implies pleasant, carefree moving about, walking with no specific purpose and for a limited distance: to ramble through fields near home. Range usually implies wandering over a more or less defined but extensive area in search of something: Cattle range over the plains. Rove sometimes implies wandering with specific incentive or aim, as an animal for prey: Bandits rove through these mountains.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for roaming
  • Fact is, increased roaming by our ancestors is pure speculation and counter to the behaviour of other predators.
  • At night, the only sounds came from the bells of roaming cattle and the branches scratching the roof.
  • Obesity, limited roaming space, and lack of companionship are thought to contribute to the early deaths.
  • And by extension, any lone stars roaming between galaxies that are far enough away will never be seen by us.
  • Unlike cats, bears aren't typically territorial, roaming instead over vast areas that would be impossible to patrol for intruders.
  • He and his friends had been peacefully roaming in the shaded forest, snapping branches filled with sweet gum.
  • They couldn't live with unsettled ghosts roaming around.
  • Unfortunately the roaming cattle ranchers follow a different logic and will not be turned into agro-businessmen overnight.
  • When violent crime strikes a social network, the ghosts of the dead start roaming the machines.
  • The big payoff: improved system performance, cheaper service cost, and seamless roaming.
British Dictionary definitions for roaming

roam

/rəʊm/
verb
1.
to travel or walk about with no fixed purpose or direction; wander
noun
2.
the act of roaming
Derived Forms
roamer, noun
Word Origin
C13: origin unknown
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for roaming

roam

v.

c.1300, romen, possibly from Old English *ramian "act of wandering about," which is probably related to aræman "arise, lift up." There are no certain cognate forms in other Germanic languages, but Barnhart points to Old Norse reimuðr "act of wandering about," reimast "to haunt." "Except in late puns, there is no evidence of connexion with the Romance words denoting pilgrims or pilgrimages to Rome ...." [OED], such as Spanish romero "a pilot-fish; a pilgrim;" Old French romier "travelling as a pilgrim; a pilgrim," from Medieval Latin romerius "a pilgrim" (originally to Rome). Related: Roamed; roamer; roaming.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Slang definitions & phrases for roaming

roam

verb

To use a cellular phone outside of one's own service area: Hi honey. I'm roaming in San Francisco (1990s+)


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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10
13
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