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rouse1

[rouz] /raʊz/
verb (used with object), roused, rousing.
1.
to bring out of a state of sleep, unconsciousness, inactivity, fancied security, apathy, depression, etc.:
He was roused to action by courageous words.
2.
to stir or incite to strong indignation or anger.
3.
to cause (game) to start from a covert or lair.
4.
Nautical. to pull by main strength; haul.
verb (used without object), roused, rousing.
5.
to come out of a state of sleep, unconsciousness, inactivity, apathy, depression, etc.
6.
to start up from a covert or lair, as game.
noun
7.
a rousing.
8.
a signal for rousing; reveille.
Origin
1480-1490
1480-90 in sense “(of a hawk) to shake the feathers”; 1525-35 for def 3; origin uncertain
Related forms
rousedness
[rou-zid-nis] /ˈraʊ zɪd nɪs/ (Show IPA),
noun
rouser, noun
unroused, adjective
Synonyms
1. arouse, stir, excite, animate, stimulate, awaken, kindle, inflame, fire. 1, 2. See incite. 2. provoke, anger.
Antonyms
1, 2. lull, calm, pacify.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for roused
  • In the middle of the night, he was roused violently from sleep.
  • They roused violent protests, which eventually forced the government to change its mind.
  • But animals roused from hibernation by warmer temperatures in late winter or early spring may find nature's larder bare.
  • Maybe you were in a cab leaving the airport when the skyline first roused itself into view.
  • The government has been roused to convene all the main political parties for a national anti-terrorism conference.
  • The land had roused a fascination in me, an engagement with my surroundings.
  • The climb roused me from a lethargy induced by too little sleep.
  • Perhaps it is because they are great queuers, roused to special fury by anyone cutting in line.
  • Archaeological evidence suggests that when roused it is even more destructive.
  • The emotions roused by the fight for the chocolate-maker go far beyond the business specifics, however.
British Dictionary definitions for roused

rouse1

/raʊz/
verb
1.
to bring (oneself or another person) out of sleep, unconsciousness, etc, or (of a person) to come to consciousness in this way
2.
(transitive) to provoke, stir, or excite: to rouse someone's anger
3.
rouse oneself, to become active or energetic
4.
(hunting) to start or cause to start from cover: to rouse game birds
5.
(intransitive) (falconry) (of hawks) to ruffle the feathers and cause them to stand briefly on end (a sign of contentment)
6.
(Austral) (raʊs), (intransitive) foll by on. to speak scoldingly or rebukingly (to)
noun
7.
(mainly US) another term for reveille
Derived Forms
rousedness (ˈraʊzɪdnɪs) noun
Word Origin
C15 (in sense 5): origin obscure

rouse2

/raʊz/
noun (archaic)
1.
an alcoholic drink, esp a full measure
2.
another word for carousal
Word Origin
C17: probably a variant of carouse (as in the phrase drink a rouse, erroneous for drink carouse); compare Danish drikke en rus to become drunk, German Rausch drunkenness
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for roused

rouse

v.

mid-15c., intransitive probably from Anglo-French or Old French reuser, ruser, originally used in English of hawks shaking the feathers of the body, but like many hawking terms it is of obscure origin. Figurative meaning "to stir up, provoke to activity" is from 1580s; that of "awaken" is first recorded 1590s. Related: Roused; rousing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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