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spearing

[speer-ing] /ˈspɪər ɪŋ/
noun, Ice Hockey.
1.
an illegal check in which a player jabs an opponent with the end of the stick blade or the top end of the stick, resulting in a penalty.
Origin of spearing
1770-1780
1770-80, for literal sense; spear1 + -ing1

spear1

[speer] /spɪər/
noun
1.
a long, stabbing weapon for thrusting or throwing, consisting of a wooden shaft to which a sharp-pointed head, as of iron or steel, is attached.
2.
a soldier or other person armed with such a weapon; spearman:
an army of 40,000 spears.
3.
a similar weapon or stabbing implement, as one for use in fishing.
4.
the act of spearing.
adjective
verb (used with object)
6.
to pierce with or as with a spear.
verb (used without object)
7.
to go or penetrate like a spear:
The plane speared through the clouds.
Origin
before 900; Middle English (noun), Old English spere; cognate with Dutch, German speer
Related forms
spearer, noun

spear2

[speer] /spɪər/
noun
1.
a sprout or shoot of a plant, as a blade of grass or an acrospire of grain.
verb (used without object)
2.
to sprout; shoot; send up or rise in a spear or spears.
Origin
1520-30; variant of spire1, perhaps influenced by spear1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for spearing
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Adams, the sailmaker, killed one of these latter gentry with a harpoon, spearing him from the bowsprit as he came past the ship.

    Afloat at Last John Conroy Hutcheson
  • They broke our ships and killed my companions, spearing them like fish.

  • The blacks did not often succeed in spearing loose horses, the slower-moving cattle being their favoured victims.

    Tom Gerrard Louis Becke
  • He then set a couple of his men to watch for danger, and the spearing began.

    The Silver Canyon George Manville Fenn
  • Then the lady came to Mr. spearing, and Mr. spearing told the lady a sheet of stamped paper would not do, it must be a book.

    Historic Oddities Sabine Baring-Gould
  • Taken to spearing the cattle, and the men too if they get a chance.

    The Moving Finger Mary Gaunt
  • Soon it was spearing southward above the waters of the Atlantic.

  • These are used in deep rivers, where spearing by wading is impracticable.

    Poachers and Poaching John Watson
British Dictionary definitions for spearing

spear1

/spɪə/
noun
1.
a weapon consisting of a long shaft with a sharp pointed end of metal, stone, or wood that may be thrown or thrust
2.
a similar implement used to catch fish
3.
another name for spearman
verb
4.
to pierce (something) with or as if with a spear
Derived Forms
spearer, noun
Word Origin
Old English spere; related to Old Norse spjör spears, Greek sparos gilthead

spear2

/spɪə/
noun
1.
a shoot, slender stalk, or blade, as of grass, asparagus, or broccoli
Word Origin
C16: probably variant of spire1, influenced by spear1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for spearing

spear

n.

Old English spere, from Proto-Germanic *speri (cf. Old Norse spjör, Old Saxon, Old Frisian sper, Dutch speer, Old High German sper, German Speer "spear"), from PIE root *sper- "spear, pole" (cf. Old Norse sparri "spar, rafter," and perhaps also Latin sparus "hunting spear").

"sprout of a plant," 1540s, variant of spire.

v.

1755, from spear (n.1). Related: Speared; spearing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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11
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