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subordinated

[suh-bawr-dn-ey-tid] /səˈbɔr dnˌeɪ tɪd/
adjective, Finance.
1.
noting or designating a debt obligation whose holder is placed in precedence below secured and general creditors:
subordinated debentures.
Origin
Related forms
unsubordinated, adjective

subordinate

[adj., n. suh-bawr-dn-it; v. suh-bawr-dn-eyt] /adj., n. səˈbɔr dn ɪt; v. səˈbɔr dnˌeɪt/
adjective
1.
placed in or belonging to a lower order or rank.
2.
of less importance; secondary.
3.
subject to or under the authority of a superior.
4.
subservient or inferior.
5.
subject; dependent.
6.
Grammar.
  1. acting as a modifier, as when I finished, which is subordinate to They were glad in They were glad when I finished.
  2. noting or pertaining to a subordinating conjunction.
7.
Obsolete, submissive.
noun
8.
a subordinate person or thing.
verb (used with object), subordinated, subordinating.
9.
to place in a lower order or rank.
10.
to make secondary (usually followed by to):
to subordinate work to pleasure.
11.
to make subject, subservient, or dependent (usually followed by to):
to subordinate passion to reason.
Origin
1425-75; late Middle English (adj.) < Medieval Latin subōrdinātus past participle of subōrdināre to subordinate, equivalent to Latin sub- sub- + ōrdin- (stem of ōrdō) rank, order + -ātus -ate1
Related forms
subordinately, adverb
subordinateness, noun
subordination, subordinacy
[suh-bawr-dn-uh-see] /səˈbɔr dn ə si/ (Show IPA),
noun
subordinative
[suh-bawr-dn-ey-tiv, -bawr-dn-uh-] /səˈbɔr dnˌeɪ tɪv, -ˈbɔr dn ə-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
nonsubordinate, adjective
nonsubordinating, adjective
presubordinate, verb (used with object), presubordinated, presubordinating.
self-subordinating, adjective
unsubordinate, adjective
unsubordinative, adjective
Synonyms
2. ancillary. 8. inferior, subject. 9. lower, reduce.
Antonyms
2. superior; primary.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for subordinated
  • Onlookers are utterly subordinated to the dominating and exotic declaration.
  • Local details are subordinated to subjective musings.
  • Undoubtedly there is a right way of reading, so it be sternly subordinated.
  • Native groups who were subordinated often took upon a role as shock troops against the unconquered peoples beyond the frontier.
  • Calling a tongue a dialect implies that it is derived from and subordinated to a more formal language.
  • The source of capital may be subordinated debt or equity.
  • Provides subordinated debt investments to profitable later-stage companies.
  • The partners created the subordinated mortgages to protect their equity in the properties from partnership creditors.
  • subordinated debt is generally viewed as an ideal instrument for providing bank market discipline for three main reasons.
  • Federal interest in the property is not subordinated to those of non-Federal parties.
British Dictionary definitions for subordinated

subordinate

adjective (səˈbɔːdɪnɪt)
1.
of lesser order or importance
2.
under the authority or control of another: a subordinate functionary
noun (səˈbɔːdɪnɪt)
3.
a person or thing that is subordinate
verb (səˈbɔːdɪˌneɪt) (transitive) usually foll by to
4.
to put in a lower rank or position (than)
5.
to make subservient: to subordinate mind to heart
Derived Forms
subordinately, adverb
subordination, subordinateness, noun
subordinative, adjective
Word Origin
C15: from Medieval Latin subordināre, from Latin sub- + ordō rank
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for subordinated

subordinate

adj.

mid-15c., from Medieval Latin subordinatus "placed in a lower order, made subject," past participle of subordinare "place in a lower order," from Latin sub "under" (see sub-) + ordinare "arrange" (see ordain). Related: Subordinance; subordinant.

v.

"to bring into a subordinate position," 1590s; see subordinate (adj.). Related: Subordinated; subordinating.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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16
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