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tax

[taks] /tæks/
noun
1.
a sum of money demanded by a government for its support or for specific facilities or services, levied upon incomes, property, sales, etc.
2.
a burdensome charge, obligation, duty, or demand.
verb (used with object)
3.
  1. to demand a tax from (a person, business, etc.).
  2. to demand a tax in consideration of the possession or occurrence of (income, goods, sales, etc.), usually in proportion to the value of money involved.
4.
to lay a burden on; make serious demands on:
to tax one's resources.
5.
to take to task; censure; reprove; accuse:
to tax one with laziness.
6.
Informal. to charge:
What did he tax you for that?
7.
Archaic. to estimate or determine the amount or value of.
verb (used without object)
8.
to levy taxes.
Origin
1250-1300
1250-1300; (v.) Middle English taxen < Medieval Latin taxāre to tax, appraise, Latin: to appraise, handle, frequentative of tangere to touch; (noun) Middle English, derivative of the v.
Related forms
taxer, noun
taxingly, adverb
taxless, adjective
taxlessly, adverb
taxlessness, noun
antitax, adjective
nontax, noun, adjective
nontaxer, noun
protax, adjective
retax, verb (used with object)
self-taxed, adjective
subtaxer, noun
undertaxed, adjective
untax, verb (used with object)
well-taxed, adjective
Can be confused
tacks, tax.
Synonyms
1. duty, impost, levy. 4. strain, tire, stretch.

taxis1

[tak-sis] /ˈtæk sɪs/
noun, plural taxes
[tak-seez] /ˈtæk siz/ (Show IPA)
1.
arrangement or order, as in one of the physical sciences.
2.
Biology. oriented movement of a motile organism in response to an external stimulus, as toward or away from light.
3.
Surgery. the replacing of a displaced part, or the reducing of a hernia or the like, by manipulation without cutting.
4.
Architecture. the adaptation to the purposes of a building of its various parts.
Origin
1720-30; < Neo-Latin < Greek táxis, equivalent to tak- (base of tássein to arrange, put in order) + -sis -sis

taxis2

[tak-seez] /ˈtæk siz/
noun
1.
a plural of taxi.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for taxes
  • Workers at all income levels are affected by regional differences in federal taxes.
  • Most colleges and universities are non-profit and as such don't pay taxes.
  • The town center contains an open hall with eight silos, partially used to collect grain taxes from farmers.
  • Keeping taxes means the only companies that can afford to work here are the ones that cut corners.
  • Luckily this kind of conscientiousness is a lot more fun than, say, filling out your taxes on time.
  • No government can survive indefinitely while catering to the fantasy that taxes are evil or unnecessary.
  • In previous years, the survey reported only appropriations from state taxes.
  • Changes in taxes on capital income also generate bigger responses than changes on labour income.
  • As the value of the property heightened, taxes increased, forcing many to leave the area.
  • State tax collectors are getting aggressive about billing smokers for taxes on online tobacco purchases.
British Dictionary definitions for taxes

tax

/tæks/
noun
1.
a compulsory financial contribution imposed by a government to raise revenue, levied on the income or property of persons or organizations, on the production costs or sales prices of goods and services, etc
2.
a heavy demand on something; strain a tax on our resources
verb (transitive)
3.
to levy a tax on (persons, companies, etc, or their incomes, etc)
4.
to make heavy demands on; strain to tax one's intellect
5.
to accuse, charge, or blame he was taxed with the crime
6.
to determine (the amount legally chargeable or allowable to a party to a legal action), as by examining the solicitor's bill of costs to tax costs
7.
(slang) to steal
Derived Forms
taxer, noun
taxless, adjective
Word Origin
C13: from Old French taxer, from Latin taxāre to appraise, from tangere to touch

taxis

/ˈtæksɪs/
noun
1.
the movement of a cell or organism in a particular direction in response to an external stimulus
2.
(surgery) the repositioning of a displaced organ or part by manual manipulation only
Word Origin
C18: via New Latin from Greek: arrangement, from tassein to place in order
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for taxes

tax

v.

c.1300, "impose a tax on," from Old French taxer "impose a tax" (13c.), from Latin taxare "evaluate, estimate, assess, handle," also "censure, charge," probably a frequentative form of tangere "to touch" (see tangent). Sense of "burden, put a strain on" first recorded 1670s; that of "censure, reprove" is from 1560s. Its use in Luke ii for Greek apographein "to enter on a list, enroll" is due to Tyndale. Related: Taxed; taxing.

n.

early 14c., "obligatory contribution levied by a sovereign or government," from Anglo-French tax, Old French taxe, and directly from Medieval Latin taxa, from Latin taxare (see tax (v.)). Related: taxes. Tax shelter is attested from 1961.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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taxes in Medicine

taxis tax·is (tāk'sĭs)
n. pl. tax·es (tāk'sēz)

  1. The responsive movement of a free-moving organism or cell toward or away from an external stimulus, such as light.

  2. The moving of a body part by manipulation into normal position, as after a dislocation.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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taxes in the Bible

first mentioned in the command (Ex. 30:11-16) that every Jew from twenty years and upward should pay an annual tax of "half a shekel for an offering to the Lord." This enactment was faithfully observed for many generations (2 Chr. 24:6; Matt. 17:24). Afterwards, when the people had kings to reign over them, they began, as Samuel had warned them (1 Sam. 8:10-18), to pay taxes for civil purposes (1 Kings 4:7; 9:15; 12:4). Such taxes, in increased amount, were afterwards paid to the foreign princes that ruled over them. In the New Testament the payment of taxes, imposed by lawful rulers, is enjoined as a duty (Rom. 13:1-7; 1 Pet. 2:13, 14). Mention is made of the tax (telos) on merchandise and travellers (Matt. 17:25); the annual tax (phoros) on property (Luke 20:22; 23:2); the poll-tax (kensos, "tribute," Matt. 17:25; 22:17; Mark 12:14); and the temple-tax ("tribute money" = two drachmas = half shekel, Matt. 17:24-27; comp. Ex. 30:13). (See TRIBUTE.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with taxes
In addition to the idiom beginning with tax also see: death and taxes
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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