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ultrasound

[uhl-truh-sound] /ˈʌl trəˌsaʊnd/
noun
1.
Physics. sound with a frequency greater than 20,000 Hz, approximately the upper limit of human hearing.
2.
Medicine/Medical. the application of ultrasonic waves to therapy or diagnostics, as in deep-heat treatment of a joint or imaging of internal structures.
Compare ultrasonography.
Origin
1920-1925
1920-25; ultra- + sound1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for ultrasound
  • They will then perform an ultrasound to confirm the pregnancy.
  • Then they released a bat-and observed the attacks via high-speed video and ultrasound detectors.
  • Carotid duplex is an ultrasound test that shows how well blood is flowing through the carotid arteries.
  • ultrasound is a painless technique, which uses sound waves to image the uterus and ovaries.
  • ultrasound or other imaging techniques can usually detect gallstones.
  • ultrasound may also be used to measure the volume of remaining urine.
  • ultrasound is a painless procedure that can give an accurate picture of the size and shape of the prostate gland.
  • If you have a lump on your thyroid, your doctor will order blood tests and an ultrasound of the thyroid gland.
  • Gastrointestinal x-rays or ultrasound may show rotation of the internal organs.
  • Your health care provider may discover a cyst during a physical exam, or when you have an ultrasound test for another reason.
British Dictionary definitions for ultrasound

ultrasound

/ˈʌltrəˌsaʊnd/
noun
1.
ultrasonic waves at frequencies above the audible range (above about 20 kHz), used in cleaning metallic parts, echo sounding, medical diagnosis and therapy, etc
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for ultrasound

1923, from ultra- + sound. Cf. ultrasonic. In reference to ultrasonic techniques of detection or diagnosis it is recorded from 1958.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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ultrasound in Medicine

ultrasound ul·tra·sound (ŭl'trə-sound')
n.

  1. Ultrasonic sound.

  2. The use of ultrasonic waves for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes, specifically to visualize an internal body structure, monitor a developing fetus, or generate localized deep heat to the tissues.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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ultrasound in Science
ultrasound
  (ŭl'trə-sound')   
  1. Sound whose frequency is above the upper limit of the range of human hearing (approximately 20 kilohertz).

  2. See ultrasonography.

  3. An image produced by ultrasonography.


ultrasonic adjective (ŭl'trə-sŏn'ĭk)
Our Living Language  : Many people use simple ultrasound generators. Dog whistles, for example, produce tones that dogs can hear but that are too high to be heard by humans. Sound whose frequency is higher than the upper end of the normal range of human hearing (higher than about 20,000 hertz) is called ultrasound. (Sound at frequencies too low to be audible—about 20 hertz or lower—is called infrasound.) Medical ultrasound images, such as those of a fetus in the womb, are made by directing ultrasonic waves into the body, where they bounce off internal organs and other objects and are reflected back to a detector. Ultrasound imaging, also known as ultrasonography, is particularly useful in conditions such as pregnancy, when x-rays can be harmful. Because ultrasonic waves have very short wavelengths, they interact with very small objects and thus provide images with high resolution. For this reason ultrasound is also used in some microscopes. Ultrasound can also be used to focus large amounts of energy into very small spaces by aiming multiple ultrasonic beams in such a way that the waves are in phase at one precise location, making it possible, for example, to break up kidney stones without surgical incision and without disturbing surrounding tissue. Ultrasound's industrial uses include measuring thicknesses of materials, testing for structural defects, welding, and aquatic sonar.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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ultrasound in Culture

ultrasound definition


A method of diagnosing illness and viewing internal body structures in which sound waves of high frequency are bounced off internal organs and tissues from outside the body. The technique measures different amounts of resistance the body parts offer to the sound waves, and then uses the data to produce a “picture” of the structures. Ultrasound is often used to obtain an image of the developing fetus in pregnant women; the image can confirm the presence of twins or triplets and can be used to diagnose some abnormalities.

Note: When an image of the inside of the body is needed, ultrasound is often considered a safer alternative to x-rays. Like x-rays, ultrasound involves exposure of the body to a form of radiation; unlike x-rays, ultrasound has not been shown to be carcinogenic.
The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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