unbridled

[uhn-brahyd-ld]

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English unbrydled. See un-1, bridled

Dictionary.com Unabridged

unbridle

[uhn-brahyd-l]
verb (used with object), unbridled, unbridling.
1.
to remove the bridle from (a horse, mule, etc.).
2.
to free from restraint.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English unbridlen. See un-2, bridle (v.)

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
unbridle (ʌnˈbraɪdəl)
 
vb
1.  to remove the bridle from (a horse)
2.  to remove all controls or restraints from

unbridled (ʌnˈbraɪdəld)
 
adj
1.  with all restraints removed
2.  (of a horse, etc) wearing no bridle
 
un'bridledly
 
adv
 
un'bridledness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

unbridled
late 14c., originally in fig. sense of "unrestrained, ungoverned," from un- (1) "not" + bridled (see bridle). Cf. M.Du. ongebreidelt. Lit. sense of "not fitted with a bridle" (of horses) is not recorded before 1553. The verb unbridle is attested
from c.1400 in the lit. sense; c.1440 in the fig. sense.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
But his unbridled free-trade policies don't help make that case.
Several other governments have felt the lash of his unbridled tongue.
Changing diet, with a growing emphasis on meat, illustrates the environmental
  and societal toll exacted by unbridled consumption.
Greenspan's retirement should be viewed as a serious risk factor, not as an
  opportunity for unbridled prosperity.
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