boost

[boost]
verb (used with object)
1.
to lift or raise by pushing from behind or below.
2.
to advance or aid by speaking well of; promote: She always boosts her hometown.
3.
to increase; raise: to boost prices; to boost the horsepower of the car by 20 percent.
4.
Slang. to steal, especially to shoplift: Two typewriters were boosted from the office last night.
verb (used without object)
5.
Slang. to engage in stealing, especially shoplifting.
noun
6.
an upward shove or raise; lift.
7.
an increase; rise: There's been a tremendous boost in food prices.
8.
an act, remark, or the like, that helps one's progress, morale, efforts, etc.: His pep talk was the boost our team needed.

Origin:
1805–15, Americanism; perhaps Scots dialect boose (variant of pouss push) + (hoi)st


7. hike, growth, upsurge, upswing, uptick.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
boost (buːst)
 
n
1.  encouragement, improvement, or help: a boost to morale
2.  an upward thrust or push: he gave him a boost over the wall
3.  an increase or rise: a boost in salary
4.  a publicity campaign; promotion
5.  the amount by which the induction pressure of a supercharged internal-combustion engine exceeds that of the ambient pressure
 
vb
6.  to encourage, assist, or improve: to boost morale
7.  to lift by giving a push from below or behind
8.  to increase or raise: to boost the voltage in an electrical circuit
9.  to cause to rise; increase: to boost sales
10.  to advertise on a big scale
11.  to increase the induction pressure of (an internal-combustion engine) above that of the ambient pressure; supercharge
 
[C19: of unknown origin]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

boost
1815 (v.), 1825 (n.), Amer.Eng., of unknown origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
boost   (bst)  Pronunciation Key 
A linear map from one reference frame to another in which each coordinate is increased or decreased by an independent constant or linear function. A boost corresponds to a shift of the entire coordinate system without any rotation of its axes.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Example sentences
Backyard vegetables can fight crime, improve health, and boost the economy.
When consumed by humans, it is thought to boost energy and increase
  concentration.
The college has also been working to boost its retention.
Automakers have started using hybrid technology to boost power rather than
  efficiency.
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