inhuman

[in-hyoo-muhn or, often, -yoo-]
adjective
1.
lacking qualities of sympathy, pity, warmth, compassion, or the like; cruel; brutal: an inhuman master.
2.
not suited for human beings.
3.
not human.

Origin:
1475–85; < Latin inhūmānus; replacing late Middle English inhumain < Middle French < L. See in-3, human

inhumanly, adverb
inhumanness, noun

inhuman, inhumane.


1. unfeeling, unsympathetic, cold, callous, hard, savage, brutish.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To inhuman
Collins
World English Dictionary
inhuman (ɪnˈhjuːmən)
 
adj
1.  Also: inhumane lacking humane feelings, such as sympathy, understanding, etc; cruel; brutal
2.  not human
 
inhu'manely
 
adv
 
in'humanly
 
adv
 
in'humanness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inhuman
c.1477 (implied in inhumanity), from L. inhumanus "inhuman, savage, cruel," from in- "not" + humanus "human." Spelled inhumane till 18c. (see humane).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
Prehistoric marine reptiles, both alien and awe-inspiring, at once utterly
  inhuman and somehow irresistibly compelling.
The current regime here is dealing with them in an inhuman way, arresting and
  torturing them.
Scientists understand that evolution is a brutal, inhuman process.
As inhuman and inefficient as it may be, torture is sometimes the only route
  available to getting the truth.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature