oversee

[oh-ver-see]
verb (used with object), oversaw, overseen, overseeing.
1.
to direct (work or workers); supervise; manage: He was hired to oversee the construction crews.
2.
to see or observe secretly or unintentionally: We happened to oversee the burglar leaving the premises. He was overseen stealing the letters.
3.
to survey or watch, as from a higher position.
4.
to look over; examine; inspect.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English overseen, Old English ofersēon. See over-, see1

overlook, oversee, oversight.
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World English Dictionary
oversee (ˌəʊvəˈsiː)
 
vb , -sees, -seeing, -saw, -seen
1.  to watch over and direct; supervise
2.  to watch secretly or accidentally

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

oversee
O.E. oferseon "to look down upon, keep watch over," from ofer "over" + seon "to see" (see see). Meaning "to supervise" is attested from mid-15c. The verb lacks the double sense of similar overlook (q.v.), but this emerges in the noun form oversight.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Throughout the early years of the company, he oversaw business details while
  continuing to write code.
To some extent, whether clients got put into questionable investments depended
  on which senior manager oversaw their account.
At first the former policeman, who likes to cultivate a strongman image,
  oversaw swift progress.
Whalen oversaw a broad diversification into mutual funds, public finance and
  litigation.
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