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rut1

[ruht] /rʌt/
noun
1.
a furrow or track in the ground, especially one made by the passage of a vehicle or vehicles.
2.
any furrow, groove, etc.
3.
a fixed or established mode of procedure or course of life, usually dull or unpromising:
to fall into a rut.
verb (used with object), rutted, rutting.
4.
to make a rut or ruts in; furrow.
Origin
1570-1580
1570-80; perhaps variant of route

rut2

[ruht] /rʌt/
noun
1.
the periodically recurring sexual excitement of the deer, goat, sheep, etc.
verb (used without object), rutted, rutting.
2.
to be in the condition of rut.
Origin
1375-1425; late Middle English rutte < Middle French rut, ruit < Late Latin rugītus a roaring, equivalent to Latin rugī(re) to roar + -tus suffix of v. action
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for rutting
  • Mothers with calves and rutting bulls are particularly unpredictable.
  • On major travel routes, roads are generally in good shape, although you might encounter some rutting and potholes.
  • He's probably off rutting in some field with the other goats.
  • Their antlers are hardened and testosterone levels are increasing as the rutting time approaches.
  • The creep slope is a measure of rutting resistance before moisture starts to significantly damage the specimen.
  • rutting damage due to different axle configurations is approximately proportional to the number of axles within an axle group.
  • rutting is the occurrence of longitudinal surface depressions or channels in the wheel path.
  • Areas of sustained and repeated rutting may require more severe measures.
  • Although usually shy, moose can feel threatened and become aggressive during the rutting season or after calving.
  • rutting or cracking due to overload of the pavement structure.
British Dictionary definitions for rutting

rut1

/rʌt/
noun
1.
a groove or furrow in a soft road, caused by wheels
2.
any deep mark, hole, or groove
3.
a narrow or predictable way of life, set of attitudes, etc; dreary or undeviating routine (esp in the phrase in a rut)
verb ruts, rutting, rutted
4.
(transitive) to make a rut or ruts in
Word Origin
C16: probably from French route road

rut2

/rʌt/
noun
1.
a recurrent period of sexual excitement and reproductive activity in certain male ruminants, such as the deer, that corresponds to the period of oestrus in females
2.
another name for oestrus
verb ruts, rutting, rutted
3.
(intransitive) (of male ruminants) to be in a period of sexual excitement and activity
Word Origin
C15: from Old French rut noise, roar, from Latin rugītus, from rugīre to roar
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for rutting

rut

n.

"narrow track worn or cut in the ground," 1570s, probably from Middle English route (see route (n.)); though OED finds this "improbable." Metaphoric meaning "narrow, monotonous routine; habitual mode of behavior" first attested 1839.

"annually recurring sexual excitement in animals; animal mating season" (originally of deer), early 15c., from Old French rut, ruit, from Late Latin rutigum (nominative rugitus) "a bellowing," from past participle of Latin rugire "to bellow," from PIE imitative root *reu-. The verb is recorded from early 15c. Related: Rutting.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Idioms and Phrases with rutting

rut

see: in a rut
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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