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liver1

[liv-er] /ˈlɪv ər/
noun
1.
Anatomy. a large, reddish-brown, glandular organ located in the upper right side of the abdominal cavity, divided by fissures into five lobes and functioning in the secretion of bile and various metabolic processes.
2.
an organ in other animals similar to the human liver, often used as food.
3.
a diseased condition of the liver; biliousness:
a touch of liver.
4.
a reddish-brown color.
5.
a rubberlike, irreversible thickening suspension occurring in paint, ink, etc., due to a chemical reaction between a colloidal pigment and a vehicle or as a result of polymerization of the vehicle.
adjective
6.
of the color of liver.
verb (used without object)
7.
(of paint, ink, etc.) to undergo irreversible thickening.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English lifer, cognate with Dutch lever, German Leber, Old Norse lifr; perhaps akin to Greek liparós fat
Related forms
liverless, adjective

liver2

[liv-er] /ˈlɪv ər/
noun
1.
a person who lives in a manner specified:
an extravagant liver.
2.
a dweller or resident; inhabitant.
Origin
1325-75; Middle English; see live1, -er1

liver3

[lahy-ver] /ˈlaɪ vər/
adjective
1.
comparative of live2 .

live2

[lahyv] /laɪv/
adjective, liver, livest for 4–7, 13–15.
1.
being alive; living; alive:
live animals.
2.
of, pertaining to, or during the life of a living being:
the animal's live weight.
3.
characterized by or indicating the presence of living creatures:
the live sounds of the forest.
4.
Informal. (of a person) energetic; alert; lively:
The club members are a really live bunch.
5.
full of life, energy or activity:
His approach in any business dealing is live and fresh.
6.
burning or glowing:
live coals in the fireplace.
7.
having resilience or bounce:
a live tennis ball.
8.
being in play, as a baseball or football.
9.
loaded or unexploded, as a cartridge or shell:
live ammunition.
10.
made up of actual persons:
to perform before a live audience.
11.
(of a radio or television program) broadcast while happening or being performed; not prerecorded or taped:
a live telecast.
12.
being highly resonant or reverberant, as an auditorium or concert hall.
13.
vivid or bright, as color.
14.
of current interest or importance, as a question or issue; controversial; unsettled.
15.
moving or imparting motion; powered:
the live head on a lathe.
16.
still in use, or to be used, as type set up or copy for printing.
17.
Also, alive. Electricity. electrically connected to a source of potential difference, or electrically charged so as to have a potential different from that of earth:
a live wire.
adverb
18.
(of a radio or television program) at the moment of its happening or being performed; not on tape or by prerecording:
a program broadcast live.
Idioms
19.
live one, Slang.
  1. a person who spends money readily.
  2. a person easily imposed upon or made the dupe of others.
Origin
1535-45; 1930-35 for def 11; aphetic variant of alive, used attributively
Related forms
liveness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for liver
  • liver metastases are cancerous tumors that have spread to the liver from somewhere else in the body.
  • Three weeks later, he was in the hospital with liver failure.
  • liver disease, by contrast, often causes the breath to smell fishy.
  • The liver itself is the body's main chemical factory, performing hundreds of different functions.
  • Researchers have developed a new strategy for fighting the degradations of aging in the liver.
  • Actually, it was probably the crab's liver and pancreas, often called mustard or tomalley.
  • Researchers investigate a new treatment for liver cancer that could help patients too sick for traditional surgery.
  • Newspapers reported that the creams could cause skin irritation and damage to the liver and lungs.
  • On a zero-fat diet, the mice developed fatty liver disease.
  • In tinkering with the body's hormonal balance, fructose also causes the liver to spew more fat into the bloodstream than normal.
British Dictionary definitions for liver

liver1

/ˈlɪvə/
noun
1.
a multilobed highly vascular reddish-brown glandular organ occupying most of the upper right part of the human abdominal cavity immediately below the diaphragm. It secretes bile, stores glycogen, detoxifies certain poisons, and plays an important part in the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fat, helping to maintain a correct balance of nutrients related adjective hepatic
2.
the corresponding organ in animals
3.
the liver of certain animals used as food
4.
a reddish-brown colour, sometimes with a greyish tinge
Derived Forms
liverless, adjective
Word Origin
Old English lifer; related to Old High German lebrav, Old Norse lefr, Greek liparos fat

liver2

/ˈlɪvə/
noun
1.
a person who lives in a specified way a fast liver

live1

/lɪv/
verb (mainly intransitive)
1.
to show the characteristics of life; be alive
2.
to remain alive or in existence
3.
to exist in a specified way to live poorly
4.
usually foll by in or at. to reside or dwell to live in London
5.
(often foll by on) to continue or last the pain still lives in her memory
6.
(usually foll by by) to order one's life (according to a certain philosophy, religion, etc)
7.
foll by on, upon, or by. to support one's style of life; subsist to live by writing
8.
(foll by with) to endure the effects (of a crime, mistake, etc)
9.
(foll by through) to experience and survive he lived through the war
10.
(transitive) to pass or spend (one's life, etc)
11.
to enjoy life to the full he knows how to live
12.
(transitive) to put into practice in one's daily life; express he lives religion every day
13.
live and let live, to refrain from interfering in others' lives; to be tolerant
14.
(US, informal) where one lives, in one's sensitive or defenceless position
Word Origin
Old English libban, lifian; related to Old High German libēn, Old Norse lifa

live2

/laɪv/
adjective
1.
(prenominal) showing the characteristics of life
2.
(usually prenominal) of, relating to, or abounding in life the live weight of an animal
3.
(usually prenominal) of current interest; controversial a live issue
4.
actual a real live cowboy
5.
(informal) full of life and energy
6.
(of a coal, ember, etc) glowing or burning
7.
(esp of a volcano) not extinct
8.
loaded or capable of exploding a live bomb
9.
(radio, television) transmitted or present at the time of performance, rather than being a recording a live show
10.
(of a record)
  1. recorded in concert
  2. recorded in one studio take, without overdubs or splicing
11.
connected to a source of electric power a live circuit
12.
(esp of a colour or tone) brilliant or splendid
13.
acoustically reverberant a live studio
14.
(sport) (of a ball) in play
15.
(of rocks, ores, etc) not quarried or mined; native
16.
being in a state of motion or transmitting power; positively connected to a driving member
17.
(printing)
  1. (of copy) not yet having been set into type
  2. (of type that has been set) still in use
adverb
18.
during, at, or in the form of a live performance the show went out live
Word Origin
C16: from on livealive
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for liver
n.

secreting organ of the body, Old English lifer, from Proto-Germanic *librn (cf. Old Norse lifr, Old Frisian livere, Middle Dutch levere, Dutch lever, Old High German lebara, German Leber "liver"), perhaps from PIE *leip- "to stick adhere; fat." Formerly believed to be the body's blood-producing organ; in medieval times it rivaled the heart as the supposed seat of love and passion, hence lily-livered. Liver-spots, once thought to be caused by a dysfunction of the organ, is attested from 1730.

late 14c., agent noun from live (v.).

live

v.

Old English lifian (Anglian), libban (West Saxon) "to be, to live, have life; to experience," also "to supply oneself with food, to pass life (in some condition)," from Proto-Germanic *liben (cf. Old Norse lifa "to live, remain," Old Frisian libba, German leben, Gothic liban "to live"), from PIE root *leip- "to remain, continue" (cf. Greek liparein "to persist, persevere;" see leave). Meaning "to make a residence, dwell" is from c.1200. Related: Lived; living.

According to the Dutch Prouerbe ... Leuen ende laetan leuen, To liue and to let others liue. [Malynes, 1622]
To live it up "live gaily and extravagantly" is from 1903. To live up to "act in accordance with" is 1690s, from earlier live up "live on a high (moral or mental) level" (1680s). To live (something) down "outwear (some slander or embarrassment)" is from 1842. To live with "cohabit as husband and wife" is attested from 1749; sense of "to put up with" is attested from 1937. Expression live and learn is attested from c.1620.

adj.

1540s, "having life," later (1610s) "burning, glowing," a shortening of alive (q.v.). Sense of "containing unspent energy or power" (live ammunition, etc.) is from 1799. Meaning "in-person" (of performance) is first attested 1934. Live wire is attested from 1890; figurative sense of "active person" is from 1903.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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liver in Medicine

live (līv)
adj.

  1. Having life; alive.

  2. Capable of replicating in a host's cells.

  3. Containing living microorganisms or active virus, as a vaccine.

liver liv·er (lĭv'ər)
n.
The largest gland of the body, lying beneath the diaphragm in the upper right portion of the abdominal cavity, which secretes bile and is active in the formation of certain blood proteins and in the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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liver in Science
liver
  (lĭv'ər)   

  1. A large glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrate animals that is essential to many metabolic processes. The liver secretes bile, stores fat and sugar as reserve energy sources, converts harmful substances to less toxic forms, and regulates the amount of blood in the body.

  2. A similar organ of invertebrate animals.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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liver in Culture

liver definition


A large organ, located on the right side of the abdomen and protected by the lower rib cage, that produces bile and blood proteins, stores vitamins for later release into the bloodstream, removes toxins (including alcohol) from the blood, breaks down old red blood cells, and helps maintain levels of blood sugar in the body.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for liver

liver

Related Terms

chopped liver, that ain't hay


live

adjective
  1. Not recorded or taped: live music/ a live telecast (1934+)
  2. Of current importance; still to be decided: Is metrication really a live issue today? (1900+)

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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liver in the Bible

(Heb. kabhed, "heavy;" hence the liver, as being the heaviest of the viscera, Ex. 29:13, 22; Lev. 3:4, 1, 10, 15) was burnt upon the altar, and not used as sacrificial food. In Ezek. 21:21 there is allusion, in the statement that the king of Babylon "looked upon the liver," to one of the most ancient of all modes of divination. The first recorded instance of divination (q.v.) is that of the teraphim of Laban. By the teraphim the LXX. and Josephus understood "the liver of goats." By the "caul above the liver," in Lev. 4:9; 7:4, etc., some understand the great lobe of the liver itself.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with liver
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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8
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