sorriness

sorry

[sor-ee, sawr-ee]
adjective, sorrier, sorriest.
1.
feeling regret, compunction, sympathy, pity, etc.: to be sorry to leave one's friends; to be sorry for a remark; to be sorry for someone in trouble.
2.
regrettable or deplorable; unfortunate; tragic: a sorry situation; to come to a sorry end.
3.
sorrowful, grieved, or sad: Was she sorry when her brother died?
4.
associated with sorrow; suggestive of grief or suffering; melancholy; dismal.
5.
wretched, poor, useless, or pitiful: a sorry horse.
6.
(used interjectionally as a conventional apology or expression of regret): Sorry, you're misinformed. Did I bump you? Sorry.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English sārig; cognate with Low German sērig, Old High German sērag. See sore, -y1

sorrily, adverb
sorriness, noun
unsorry, adjective


1. regretful, sympathetic, pitying. 3. unhappy, depressed, sorrowing. 4. grievous, mournful, painful. 5. abject, contemptible, paltry, worthless, shabby. See wretched.


1. happy.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
sorry (ˈsɒrɪ)
 
adj (often foll by for) , -rier, -riest
1.  feeling or expressing pity, sympathy, remorse, grief, or regret: I feel sorry for him
2.  pitiful, wretched, or deplorable: a sorry sight
3.  poor; paltry: a sorry excuse
4.  affected by sorrow; sad
5.  causing sorrow or sadness
 
interj
6.  an exclamation expressing apology, used esp at the time of the misdemeanour, offence, etc
 
[Old English sārig; related to Old High German sērag; see sore]
 
'sorrily
 
adv
 
'sorriness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

sorry
O.E. sarig "distressed, full of sorrow," from W.Gmc. *sairig-, from *sairaz "pain" (physical and mental); related to sar (see sore). Meaning "wretched, worthless, poor" first recorded mid-13c. Spelling shift from -a- to -o- by influence of sorrow. Apologetic sense (short for
I'm sorry) is attested from 1834; phrase sorry about that popularized 1960s by U.S. TV show "Get Smart."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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